Meet our scientists

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“CESOC is a great place for knowledge transfer. In my research, I focus on algorithmic techniques for geometric data analysis. I believe, algorithms research can open up new frontiers in climate science by providing tailored algorithmic techniques to attack computationally intractable problems. At the same time, the exchange with climate science researchers can bring to light fundamental algorithmic problems that are relevant in practice and require the development of new theory. Thus, CESOC feeds the development cycle and knowledge transfer between algorithmic theory and practice.”

Prof. Anne Driemel

Professor in Computer Science and Junior Fellow at Haussdorff Center for Mathematics, University of Bonn

“Our investigation in Jülich focus on global interactions of air quality and climate. The Asian monsoon circulation plays a crucial role here, because it transports heavily polluted air masses from the South-East Asian boundary layer into the global stratosphere.

In CESOC we cooperate with the University of Cologne to obtain an improved understanding of the source regions for transport of pollutants by the monsoon circulation by combining Lagrangian transport techniques with visual analyses.”

Prof. Martin Riese

Director of the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-7), Forschungszentrum Jülich

“In the Computer Vision group at IAS-8 in Jülich, our research addresses theory and algorithms for the analysis of image-based data. We use data-driven machine learning as well as modelling-based methods, develop them further and bring them into application. Initially focusing on plant science applications and close range remote sensing in previous research, in CESOC we want to explore the adaptation of computer vision techniques to the fascinating remote sensing data of Earth system observation.”

Dr. Hanno Scharr

Head of Computer Vision group, IAS-8 Data Analytics and Machine Learning, Forschungszentrum Jülich

“Forschungszentrum Jülich with world-class infrastructures is an ideal place to conduct my research on simulating the atmospheric fate of the aerosols and quantifying their gigantic impact on Earth’s energy balance and human health.

My research strongly benefits from access to the Jülich Supercomputing Centre which operates two of the most powerful supercomputers in the world.”

Dr. Alexandra Tsimpidi

Postdoctoral researcher, Institute of Energy and Climate Research: Troposphere (IEK-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich

“We conduct research on the next generation atmospheric observing approaches to enable the study of atmospheric processes at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales to provide the foundational knowledge to significantly improve Earth’s weather and climate predictability. Our group is interested in the practical use of distributed observational networks, agile adaptive sensing techniques, and the optimization of model–experiment (MODEX) systems for experimental and instrument design and model verification. CESOC offers access to resources and expertise in the areas of high-performance computing, big data, and ML/AI techniques, elements critical for achieving our scientific objectives.”

Prof. Pavlos Kollias

Former International Faculty member, University of Cologne; Stony Brook University

“Predictions for the terrestrial water and energy cycle are of immense societal relevance. We develop complex models of the terrestrial system in HPC environments with extreme temporal and spatial resolution. With data assimilation techniques using in-situ and remote sensing observations we improve the models. Still, the development poses a big scientific and technological challenge – we address this challenge in the Centre for High-Performance Scientific Computing in Terrestrial Systems (HPSC TerrSys), with colleagues and students from the Geoverbund ABC/J. CESOC, together with ECMWF scientists and HPSC TerrSys generates enormous potential for synergies and innovation.”

Prof. Stefan Kollet

Professor in Hydrology, University of Bonn and Forschungszentrum Jülich

“Our research makes data, simulations visible. Visual Analytics combines interactive visualization and data analysis for  understanding and presentation of data. CESOC offers many cooperation possibilities and open problems that can be solved using interactive visualization and visual analytics methods.”

Prof. Tatiana Landesberger von Antburg

Professor in Computer Science Visualization and Visual Analytics, University of Cologne

“We work on fundamental meteorological research for renewable power production from wind and solar energy. Our research is based on modern observations and own simulations with complex weather and climate models. In CESOC, we collaborate with partners from other disciplines for new scientific insights from big data.”

Prof. Stephanie Fiedler

Professor in Energy Meteorolgy, University of Cologne

“As a meteorologist working in a satellite geodesy team, I benefit from the collaboration with data specialists of different areas of expertise – we are excellently linked to Helmholtz institutions like the Alfred-Wegener Institute and the Jülich Supercomputing Centre.”

Dr. Sophie Stolzenberger

Postdoctoral researcher, Institute for Geodesy and Geoinformation, University of Bonn

“I chose the University of Cologne for my  Emmy-Noether Junior Researcher Project because it optimally provides a stimulating scientific environment as well as excellent research infrastructure. In my project on  understanding processes in ice clouds and associated precipitation we profit from the unique expertise and infrastructure.”

Dr. Stefan Kneifel

Junior Group leader, Institute of Geophysics and Meteorology, University of Cologne

“We work on the construction, analysis and efficient implementation of adaptive high-order numerical methods for solving advection dominated problems with a special focus on accurate prediction of turbulent flows. We develop our own open-source simulation software for instance in the novel programming language Julia Trixi.jl (github.com/trixi-framework/Trixi.jl). In particular, we are interested in high-performance computing and the effective use of massively parallel supercomputers (github.com/project-fluxo/fluxo).
CESOC is a great opportunity to collaborate with researchers from earth systems science to assess the requirements for effective numerical models in this research area to enable the transfer of our novel mathematical schemes and tools.”

Prof. Gregor Gassner

Professor in Scientific Computing and Applied Mathematics , University of Cologne

“My work is situated at the interface between Earth system science, supercomputing and data science. Specifically, we investigate the potential of state-of-the-art deep learning concepts for air quality and weather analysis and prediction. JSC is a great place to carry out multi-facetted research activities, in my case also co-leading the international initiative to assess the distribution and trends of ozone in the troposphere and spearheading FAIR data and open science principles. I am also very interested in developing new concepts for Earth system model workflows, which will enable the community to make efficient use of upcoming exascale supercomputers. CESOC provides excellent opportunities to connect with many great scientists in the region and exchange ideas about a wide range of interesting and cutting-edge topics.”

PD Dr. Martin Schultz

group leader Earth System Data Exploration research group, Jülich Supercomputing Centre

“We work on new methods to combine various types of in-situ satellite data and telescope observations with three-dimensional numerical models of the environments of the moons and planets in order to constrain their interior and to search for subsurface oceans. CESOC is a great environment for these studies as the combination of data and computational analysis is at the core of the center.”

Prof. Joachim Saur

Professor in Geophysics, University of Cologne

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